Happy Independence Day!

Happy 4th! I hope you have some all-American plans lined up to celebrate Independence Day. Weather permitting, I plan to spend some time poolside with friends, fire up the grill, and watch evening fireworks. What's on your agenda for the day? If you could use some downtime reading while you get a little holiday R&R, check out this week's medical news on the lighter side. 

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Advice for New Grad NPs from Not-So-New Grad NPs

Kicking off your nurse practitioner career is stressful to say the least. Not only are you starting a new profession, chances are that life is throwing other major transitions your way as you wrap up your NP program. You may be moving to a new city, for example, to begin working for a new employer. Each of these changes in itself can be a lot to manage. When major transitions occur simultaneously, it's natural for new grad NPs to feel overwhelmed. 

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6 Worst States for Physician Assistants

Last week we talked scope of practice regulations for physician assistants here on the MidlevelU blog. While the physician assistant career looks similar in many ways for PAs across the country, state laws do affect the way physician assistants are allowed to practice. For example, state scope of practice regulations may dictate the type of medications PAs are allowed to prescribe, or outline what physician supervision for PAs looks like. 

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Are You Aware of These 10 Drug-Herb Interactions?

By Guest Contributor Leondria Taty, MSN, FNP-C

Within the past 24 hours, you’ve probably consumed an herb and didn’t even know it. Think about it - almonds (Prunus Amygdalus), cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), cayenne (Capsicum annuum), grapes/grape seed (Vitis Vinifera), tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum), goji (Lycium barbarum), soy (Glycine max), and many others like it all derive from an herbal plant. Studies support the myriad of health benefits that herbs can provide, many of which have little to no side effects. 

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3 Apps That Take Nurse Practitioner Certification Prep Mobile

I have to say, I'm more of a pen and paper kind of studier. The simple act of writing a study guide, or manually shading in the circles for correct responses on a practice exam helps me recall the material more easily come test time. While hands on study sessions are valuable, there's also something to be said for study methods that allow for a quick, impromptu review session. Nurse practitioners preparing to take the certification exam this year may find these apps helpful for taking study sessions mobile. 

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Do Nurse Practitioners Get the Workplace Short End of the Stick?

As a nurse practitioner, I enjoy my workplace. It certainly isn't glamorous, but the facility serves its purpose. Hospitals come with a certain smell that waxes and wanes depending on the ailments of resident patients. The walls are inevitably some sort of drab pastel color - like the designer was afraid to verge to much from a healthcare facility stereotype. The nurses' lounge fridge is inevitably disgusting, a make-your-own penicillin mold situation plaguing forgotten lunches. Not to mention, the cafeteria cuisine leaves something to be desired. 

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How to Find a Clinical Preceptor for Your Nurse Practitioner Program

As a nurse practitioner student you've got a lot riding on your clinical placements. A timely graduation, not to mention your education, depend on this critical piece of your NP program. While some schools assign clinical sites to nurse practitioner students, others leave NPs to find clinical preceptors on their own. This can be a frustrating task.  

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Unexpected Perks of Working for a Small Practice

At first glance, working for a large practice can seem like the ideal opportunity, especially if you’re a new grad nurse practitioner. With bigger benefits packages, more formal training programs, and an opportunity for growth, it’s tempting to focus all of your efforts on landing a job with one. But don’t rule out smaller practices just yet. Bigger is not always better. There are many perks of working for a small practice to consider as well.

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Decoding Physician Assistant Scope of Practice Regulations

All healthcare providers, physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants alike practice under a set of rules and regulations. While some of these guidelines are implemented at a federal level, states also get a say in how providers are allowed to practice. These sets of guidelines are referred to as scope of practice regulations. State legislatures have the authority to modify them as they see fit. This means the way each type of provider practices looks different in every state. 

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5 Tips to Avoid Awkwardness When Asking for a Raise

In an ideal world, we wouldn’t have to ask for raise as a nurse practitioner; your boss would be in tune with your productivity and all of your accomplishments, and reward you for such by their own initiative. But unfortunately, in the real world, that is rarely the case. Instead it’s up to you to take charge and ask for an increase in compensation. 

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Nurse Practitioners, Are You Complying with This Reporting Law?

By Leondria Taty, MSN, FNP-C

Every state has a reportable disease list, and health care providers including nurse practitioners are required by law to report these diseases. Yes, that’s right by law. That’s because when these diseases are not reported, delayed, or incomplete, new incidences of the disease can occur and spread in your community. Here’s how it works and why it’s important.

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7 International Experiences for Learning Medical Spanish

We've been talking language skills this week on MidlevelU. From the legal requirements of working with non-English speaking patients, to the logistics of working with an interpreter, there's a lot to consider in treating patients from other cultures. While acting as your own interpreter isn't advised unless you are truly fluent, it is helpful to at least understand a few basics of languages commonly spoken by your patients. 

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