How Nurse Practitioners Can Get Free OTC Drugs(!)

There's just something great about free samples. No matter how much money you earn, or how little you need the item, getting something for nothing puts a smile on our faces. Personally, I love it when department stores allow for selection of a few cosmetic samples at checkout. I never follow up and purchase the costly lotions and fragrances, but relish testing them out when they arrive in my mailbox. So, you can imagine my delight when I discovered that drug companies have similar perks for nurse practitioners. 

The department where I am currently employed does not accommodate drug reps. So, unlike my nurse practitioner colleagues in primary care, I don't see a constant stream of samples flowing into my supply closet. Fortunately, there are a few companies that send nurse practitioners free samples of over-the-counter medications with minimal hassle. Technically these products are meant to distribute to patients, but I have to admit, some make it into my personal medicine cabinet as well. 

If you're a nurse practitioner looking for a free sample pick-me-up, check out the following companies that will deliver drugs straight to your mailbox. 

1. Tylenol 

You can never have too much acetaminophen on hand. Whether you're looking to relive pain or a fever, sample packets of Tylenol will come in handy in your clinic, not to mention setting aside a few for your own purse. Nurse practitioners can sign up online for quarterly delivery of Tylenol sample packets. 

2. Aleve 

If NSAIDs are your jam, check out Aleve's online sample promotion for healthcare providers. The anti-inflammatory will come in handy for treating patients (and yourself) for aches, pains, sprains, and strains. 

3. GI Fixes

Procter & Gamble manufactures a variety of medications to soothe upset tummies. Products include Align probiotics, Metamucil fiber supplement, and Prilosec OTC for reflux relief. Nurse practitioners may register online to have samples of these products delivered to an office address. 

4. Allergy Relief 

Popular allergy relief drugs Claritin and Zyrtec are available to nurse practitioners looking to relieve stuffy sinuses this allergy season. Drug manufacturers send free samples to NPs who indicate interest. Coupons for patients suffering from allergies are also available for delivery along with samples, or online. 

5. Dermatology Products

Neutrogena offers samples of sunscreens, hand cream, and acne wash to healthcare professionals. Aveeno provides similar product perks. The catch? These companies requires that the sample-receiving provider is employed in the dermatology specialty. My efforts to acquire free sunscreen as an emergency nurse practitioner fell flat. NPs working in derm, however, can take advantage of the offer. 

6. Vitamins

Whatever stage of life your patient is in, there's likely a vitamin to match. From prenatal vitamins recommended in pregnancy, to calcium supplements for aging bones, as nurse practitioners we encourage health by suggesting such health supplements. Let your patients test products free of charge by receiving samples. OneADay, for example, sends healthcare professionals sample prenatal vitamins. Citracal offers sample calcium supplement products. 

If you are looking to land a few samples for your practice, keep in mind that drug manufacturers will only deliver samples of OTC products to your doorstep. Prescription medication samples must be obtained through a company representative. In some locations, state law may prohibit healthcare providers from receiving medication samples. Nevada and Vermont, for example, have stricter regulations than most surrounding this practice. 

Which OTC medications do you recommend most often in your practice?

 

Comments

I'm currently in school to become an FNP, but I work in a physician's office. So as a result, I am very aware of the influx of samples drug reps will drop off to share with our patients. Regularly used OTC meds will be a welcomed product for sure. I work for an oncology practice so the samples we get tend to be more specialized. Thank you for the websites. :-)

Jill

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