Fall Cookies for the Nurses' Station

I received the perfect fall treat in the mail the other day. I arrived home from NYC to a small box on my front doorstep containing the ingredients to make cookies. The ingredients were all pre-measured and packaged up neatly in a Mason jar complete with a bow and baking instructions. Thanks to the gift from MidlevelU writer Ashley Prince, all I had to do was add the wet ingredients, bake, and viola!-the perfect fall cookies warm and doughy came straight from my very own, underused, oven. 

Whether you're a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, you know that no night shift, or day shift for that matter, is complete without a little junk food consumption at the nurses' station or in the break room. It seems there's always a coworker baking cupcakes to celebrate a birthday, a holiday, or simply a generous coworker bringing in a few snacks to share just for the fun of it. The cookie gift I recently received fits the bill for any of these occasions.

Ashley's Cranberry White Chocolate Oatmeal Cookies were just too good not to share with you all. They make the perfect bring-to-work treat to share at the nurses' station for any upcoming festivities you and your coworkers might have planed. Or, they can provide an unexpected pick me up to your coworkers during your next particularly busy shift. 

If you're in the mood for a sweet fall treat, here's the recipe:

Ingredients

1 cup + 2 tablespoons all purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup rolled oats 

1/3 cup packed brown sugar

1/3 sup white sugar

1/2 cup dried cranberries

1/2 cup white chocolate chips

1/2 cup softened butter

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

 

Baking Instructions

1. Beat egg, butter, and vanilla until well blended

2. Add dry ingredients and mix well

3. Place dough by rounded tablespoons on greased cookie sheet (don't forget to lick the spatula when you're done!)

4. Bake at 350 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes

 

What's your favorite work snack to share?

 

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