6 Reasons Employers Should Hire New Grad Nurse Practitioners

Many employers understandably shy away from hiring new grad nurse practitioners. The amount of teaching a fresh NP may need seems intimidating. Or, the employer may have had a negative experience with hiring new grads in the past. Regardless of the reason for the hesitation, employers may want to reconsider their position. 

Here are a few benefits of hiring a recently graduated nurse practitioner.

1. Adaptability

New grad NPs may need to continue their clinical learning on the job. This means that you, the employer (or your employees), must take on the task. While the job may seem daunting, new grad NPs are open to suggestions and feedback. They understand the need for continued education to perform to their full scope of practice. You can help them reach this goal in a manner that benefits your practice. New nurse practitioners don't need to unlearn bad habits. They are more amenable to working in a manner that fits well with the practice environment you have worked hard to implement. 

2. Comfort with technology

Healthcare is becoming increasingly technological in nature. New EMR systems, imaging programs, and online resources can be difficult to learn and keep up with. Nurse practitioners fresh out of school are often familiar with many of these programs and if not, are capable of learning to use them quickly. While recent nurse practitioner grads may not be quite up to speed with their clinical skills, they often may contribute to the practice in unforeseen ways such as helping staff keep up to date with EMR systems. 

3. Able to keep up with changes in healthcare

Not only is technology in healthcare changing, our healthcare delivery system itself is undergoing an overhaul. Providers that are stuck in their ways may fight these changes rather than adapt to them at the detriment of your practice. New graduates are more amenable to sticking to new healthcare rules, regulations and legislation as well as developing a practice style that accommodates change on a larger scale. 

4. Eager attitudes

New grad nurse practitioners are eager to perform. They want to do well in their first position setting a solid foundation for the rest of their career. A positive attitude can overcome the inconvenience of supporting a new grad through the transition from education to clinical practice. New NP grads may be willing to take on tasks others may not or to pick up less than ideal shifts to gain experience. While healthcare providers who have been in practice for many years often become burnt out, those with less experience are typically able to put more energy towards their career. 

5. Fresh perspective on your business model

When is the last time you asked yourself as an employer why you do things a certain way? Nurse practitioners right out of school will bring a fresh perspective to your practice. Their clinical questions or inquiries about processes and protocols within the clinic or hospital may cause you to learn or question your ways. A new perspective can lead to positive changes making up for inexperience. 

6. Opportunity for a test-run

If you're thinking about expanding your practice by adding a nurse practitioner in the near future, precept a nurse practitioner student. This serves as a prolonged job interview. First, you can make sure the nurse practitioner is a good match for your practice in regards to personality. Second, you can evaluate the NP before he/she appears on your payroll making certain their learning potential will allow them to keep up in your practice. Finally, you can even begin training your nurse practitioner preceptee while he/she is still in school. The NP will be able to master your workplace policies, systems and procedures before their first day on the job

What other benefits do you see to hiring new grad NPs?

Are you looking for a job as a new grad? From resume review to interview prep, start your job search with a MidlevelU Career Advisor.

 

You Might Also Like: Top 5 Reasons You Should Precept a Nurse Practitioner Student

 

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