Showing posts relating to: The Waiting Room: Patient Focus

3 Apps to Help Your Patients With Medication Management

Even though I have been a nurse practitioner for a number of years, I don't think I ever fully appreciated how difficult it can be for patients to manage a medication regimen until recently. Given that a few individuals close to myself have found themselves in similar situations, prescribed numerous meds, the problem now seems closer to home. Some drugs must be taken with food, and others without. Medications may be prescribed one, two, three, or even four times a day making taking each pill at the appropriate time nearly impossible. In yet other cases, drugs must be refrigerated, which makes taking them on the go a challenge. 

Continue reading

Up for Interpretation: Are Nurse Practitioners Required to Use Interpretors?

Have you ever had a text message conversation that came across totally wrong? Maybe the words in the message were in all the appropriate places, but the underlying tone was not conveyed as intended? Communication is complex, consisting not only of words, but also tone and body language. As nurse practitioners, we face even greater struggles getting the message across as we must communicate detailed medical concepts in a way that makes sense to those without a health education. The equation becomes even more complex when crossing cultural communication boundaries. 

Continue reading

4 Key Questions to Help Your Patients Make Lifestyle Changes

Last week at the Midlevels for the Medically Underserved kickoff, a speaker discussed the concept of motivational interviewing. In my eight years as a nurse practitioner, I had never been introduced to the topic. I wasn't quite sure what to expect. Midway through her discussion, I had an 'Aha!' moment that will make a significant difference in the way I interact with my patients. Here's what happened. 

Continue reading

Bling Out Your Boo Boos with these Novelty Bandages

Wearing a band aid is pretty much a major drag. The adhesive attracts ick around the edges, not to mention the bandage is usually hiding a pretty nasty scratch or scrape for which you have received much too little sympathy. Attempts to match various skin tones have helped the problem of unsightly bandages, but they still leave much to be desired. So, why not take full advantage of your next injury and have a little fun?

Continue reading

Decoding Drug Development Phases

In some practices, particularly those affiliated with academic institutions, nurse practitioners have the opportunity to offer participation in clinical trials as a treatment recourse to patients. These NPs serve as an intermediary between researchers and patients monitoring treatment progress, side effects and outcomes. In other instances, as a nurse practitioner you may recommend participation in a clinical trial to a patient who has few other options. Whatever the extent of your interaction with the pharmaceutical industry and research, background knowledge about how drugs are developed is in order. 

Continue reading

Guide to Finding Clinical Trials for Your Patients

There are times when patients come to you as a nurse practitioner as a last resort. Perhaps they have been plagued by a dermatological disorder for years, or, maybe they’ve recently received a terminal cancer diagnosis. When you have provided all the treatment you can, referred to specialty providers, and tried every trick for treatment of the condition in the medical playbook, patient care quickly turns frustrating for both parties without additional recourse.

Continue reading

The #1 Apps for Tracking Number 2's

A few weeks ago I was working in the ER helping out in triage. A woman strode into the emergency department waiting room. After a few clicks on the check-in kiosk, the nurse and I could see her chief complaint pop up on our screens-abdominal pain. A common presentation in the ER, we didn't think much of her complaint. That is, until she stepped back in the triage room to have her vital signs taken informing us she was carrying with her a Tupperware full of her own stool. 

Continue reading

Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Scare: The Cliff Notes

Last week I had a chance to talk tuberculosis with Neil Cavuto on the Fox News Channel. Recently, a traveler entering the United States from India was identified as having an extensively drug resistant form of TB. Not only may she have exposed fellow passengers in flight, she traveled to multiple states before finally seeking treatment for her symptoms in Chicago. As a result of this latest news story, your patients may have questions about the disease

Continue reading

Answering Your Patient's Questions About Listeria

Blue Bell ice cream's massive recall of all of its products from store shelves has everyone talking food safety this week. Living in the South, Blue Bell makes a frequent appearance in my personal freezer so the recall hits close to home. Friends, family, and my patients are asking what they need to know about these products potentially contaminated with Listeria.

Continue reading

What NPs Need to Know About Dietary Supplements for Improved Health Function

By MidlevelU Contributor and Nurse Practitioner Student Justin Groce

As people seek alternative methods for improving their health, the implementation of dietary supplements into daily regimens becomes more commonplace. However, many supplements are bogus and are merely supported by the "Oz effect" (which is a legitimate phenomenon, by the way). 

Continue reading

Eye Injuries Caused by Superglue...Yeah, it Happens

The first time I saw a patient in the emergency department who had mistaken a superglue bottle for Visine, it seemed like a once in a lifetime situation. I mean, who keeps hard core adhesive on their nightstand? Then, it happened again. And again. 

Continue reading

Cold and Flu Wives' Tales: Setting the Record Straight

When it comes to wintertime illnesses, it seems the old wives' tales never end. My own grandparents harped on me as a child to wear socks as running around in bare feet could cause me to catch a cold. Now, as a nurse practitioner, I see similar unfounded beliefs among my patients as well. 

Continue reading

Pages