Showing posts relating to: The Flip Side: PAs Only

The Lowdown on Hourly Pay for Physician Assistants

Physician assistants may be compensated on a hourly or salaried basis. Hourly compensation often fits well with the unconventional scheduling required by many PA positions and may also allow for greater flexibility in meeting staffing needs on part of the employer and the physician assistant team. How much should PAs expect to be paid on a hourly basis?

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How Do NP & PA Scope of Practice Laws Compare?

Scope of practice laws have wide-ranging effects on both the nurse practitioner and physician assistant professions. NPs and PAs are trained and work similarly in the clinical setting. However, state laws may make one profession more favorable than the other from a practice standpoint. Regulations affecting nurse practitioner and physician assistant's ability to practice are constantly changing but follow some overarching themes. Just how do scope of practice laws for the two professions compare?

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How Many Physician Assistants Can an MD Supervise?

Consistent with the 'physician assistant' title, PAs must practice with physician supervision. In reality, physician assistants may function almost autonomously in the everyday clinical role. But, a delegated MD must be available in some capacity, whether in-person or by phone, to help out should the need arise. The extent of required physician assistant oversight varies by state. One such component of state supervision requirements are regulations regarding the number of PAs a single physician may supervise simultaneously. 

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Why It's OK to Want a Supervising Physician

There's a movement in the nurse practitioner community to eliminate existing state requirements that NPs be supervised by or collaborate with physicians. Nurse practitioner organizations are engaged in the fight for nurse practitioner independence. While there is merit to the argument for expanding the scope of practice for NPs practicing in many states, working alongside a supervising or collaborating physician isn't always a negative. 

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How to Write Your First Physician Assistant Resume

If you're a soon to be physician assistant grad, getting your resume in order is top priority. For some PA students, the task is simple. Years of working as an EMT or other valuable direct patient care experience back up a recently acquired physician assistant education making for a solid CV. For other PA new grads, drafting a resume proves to be a daunting task. Limited relevant experience leaves a resume looking too lean to land a competitive job opportunity. 

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The Three Courses to Take Before You Graduate

By Meghan Kayan, MidlevelU Contributor and Future Physician Assistant

All college majors and pre-professional programs have a list of courses that students need to take prior to graduation or entrance into a program. However, if students plan well there is some leeway towards general education courses that can be chosen to fulfill the required number of credits to graduate. It's up to you, as a student, to decide which classes to take. Most students like to take the classes that are an easy A, but taking courses that are interesting and relevant to your plan of study will be beneficial in the long run.

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3 Ways NP Programs Should Be More Like PA Programs

Nurse practitioners and physician assistants work in very similar settings and in many cases are even used interchangeably. In the emergency department where I work, for example, NPs and PAs are hired for the same positions without a preference among management for one over the other. Although these medical providers work alongside each other performing the same job responsibilities and with similar scopes of practice, there are a few ways the nurse practitioner and physician assistant education looks different. 

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Advice for Future Physician Assistants You Can't Afford to Ignore

By Physician Assistant In-Progress Meghan Kayan

In my past blog posts I’ve preached of the importance of doing your research in order to truly understand what you’re getting yourself into. Going into the physician assistant profession isn’t something that you just do. It takes a lot of work and dedication in order to become a certified PA. 

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The Black List: States with the Lowest Physician Assistant Salaries

When you're looking for a job as a physician assistant or evaluating a potential career change, salary is a major consideration. Will furthering your education be worth the cost? If you are relocating for a position, will you be able to afford to live in your new locale? Working through the dollars and cents of your next career move is a must. 

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Find Your Ideal Physician Assistant Program with Campus Tours

By Future Physician Assistant Meghan Kayan

As all students know, college searches can be an extremely stressful time. The idea of having to find a school that is the perfect fit for you before you even attend seems almost impossible. However, touring and researching is something that has helped most students (and myself), discover their dream school and some even discover a new home.

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Explore Your Career Options with Professional Conferences

By Aspiring Physician Assistant Meghan Kayan

Each year the American Association of Physician Assistants, or AAPA, hosts a five day long conference for certified PAs, current PA students, and people looking to learn more about what is going on in the physician assistant field. The conference is held each May and the location varies from year to year. This May 2015 I was lucky enough to attend the conference in San Francisco, California.

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Balancing College Life and a Future Healthcare Profession

By Aspiring Physician Assistant Meghan Kayan

It's no surprise that the curriculum for college students looking forward to post baccalaureate medical fields is strenuous. Admidst the stress of wanting to get into a good school and trying to make Dean's list every semester, extracurricular activities and social lives can get put on the back-burner and sometimes completely forgotten. However, as a rising "super senior" I'm here to warn undergrads that a better balance may be in order. 

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