Unexpected Perks of Working for a Small Practice

At first glance, working for a large practice can seem like the ideal opportunity, especially if you’re a new grad nurse practitioner. With bigger benefits packages, more formal training programs, and an opportunity for growth, it’s tempting to focus all of your efforts on landing a job with one. But don’t rule out smaller practices just yet. Bigger is not always better. There are many perks of working for a small practice to consider as well.

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Decoding Physician Assistant Scope of Practice Regulations

All healthcare providers, physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants alike practice under a set of rules and regulations. While some of these guidelines are implemented at a federal level, states also get a say in how providers are allowed to practice. These sets of guidelines are referred to as scope of practice regulations. State legislatures have the authority to modify them as they see fit. This means the way each type of provider practices looks different in every state. 

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5 Tips to Avoid Awkwardness When Asking for a Raise

In an ideal world, we wouldn’t have to ask for raise as a nurse practitioner; your boss would be in tune with your productivity and all of your accomplishments, and reward you for such by their own initiative. But unfortunately, in the real world, that is rarely the case. Instead it’s up to you to take charge and ask for an increase in compensation. 

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Nurse Practitioners, Are You Complying with This Reporting Law?

By Leondria Taty, MSN, FNP-C

Every state has a reportable disease list, and health care providers including nurse practitioners are required by law to report these diseases. Yes, that’s right by law. That’s because when these diseases are not reported, delayed, or incomplete, new incidences of the disease can occur and spread in your community. Here’s how it works and why it’s important.

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7 International Experiences for Learning Medical Spanish

We've been talking language skills this week on MidlevelU. From the legal requirements of working with non-English speaking patients, to the logistics of working with an interpreter, there's a lot to consider in treating patients from other cultures. While acting as your own interpreter isn't advised unless you are truly fluent, it is helpful to at least understand a few basics of languages commonly spoken by your patients. 

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